Is the Pole Shift Accelerating?

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You heard Dennis Nappi II speak about the pole shift on The Seiker Podcast a couple weeks ago. Suspicious Observers and other experts on space weather have recently been calling our attention to this topic.

This morning I came across a March 21, 2018 advisory from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This advisory states that the World Magnetic Model (WMM) - a report put out every five years estimating changes in the Earth's magnetic field over the next five years - is no longer valid for the "Arctic Region." The report further states that other regions are not impacted.

WMM is used by the US Department of Defense, UK Ministry of Defence, NATO, and civilian heading and navigation systems. It's compiled every five years based on data from 120 orbiting magnetic observatories.

The report states that the magnetic field is known to be unpredictable, but this advisory is to warn all users of (WMM2015) that they may want to adjust their systems. Navigation magnetics for the Arctic Region will not be valid through the December 2019 sunset of the current WMM.

Findings of the this advisory include:

  • The WMM grid variation (GV) error is currently above the WMM performance specification. Its current value (as of February 2018) is 1.5° root-mean-square (RMS) in the Northern polar cap.
  • Assuming a constant secular variation in the coming years, the GV error in the Northern polar cap is expected to cumulatively increase until it reaches 2.02° RMS by December 31, 2019.
  • The GV error is largest in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Northern Greenland, parts of Northern Siberia, a large portion of Arctic Ocean and the Laptev Sea.
  • The GV error is within specification in the Southern polar cap. Other areas are not affected.
  • This performance degradation is caused by fast-changing core flows in the North polar region of the Earth’s outer core.

NOAA may release an updated WMM later in 2018 to bring the GV error back into specification. WeatherNation.com reported back in November that the Fairbanks, Alaska airport had to change the name of one of its runways to account for the magnetic shift. Airport runways are named based on their magnetic declination.

This is the difference between true north (pointing toward the north pole) and magnetic north (the varying direction a compass points to north based on its location on the earth). This declination is used to align planes with runways and also to determine the position of a plane or ship relative to the two poles. Runway names have to be changed as magnetic north changes which indicates a shift in the position relative to true north.

How do we know magnetic reversals happen?

The earth's magnetic field is always fluctuating, but the general direction of our poles remains constant over relatively long periods of time.  Rocks on the ocean floor with reversed magnetisms indicate this history of periodic pole shifts. No one knows whether these shifts are sudden or gradual.

What should we think? Who should we believe?

Live Science argues that these shifts have happened hundreds of times before and they side with the gradual theory. Therefore, they say there's nothing to be concerned about. Meanwhile, National Geographic points out that much human technology and important aspects of life on earth like animal migration rely on the magnetic field. The article argues that, at a minimum, a pole shift would cause massive disruption.

Around our world and beneath our seas we're finding new evidence every day that past "mythical" cities and civilizations may have been real and possibly even highly advanced. Sites like Gobekli Tepe make us ponder what would have caused people to build such a massive underground facility. What were they protecting themselves from? Could these be evidence that past Earth civilizations have tried to prepare and protect themselves from pole shifts?

The fact is, my friends, no one really has all the answers related to the pole shift. Like so many of these topics it's fascinating and frightening all at once. Our job is not be to be Chicken Little running and screaming that the sky is falling. Our job is to be aware and as prepared as we can be for whatever comes. 

Ray Davis
for 6 Sense Media