Why Mainstream Egyptology Starts from the Wrong Place

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Who built the Great Pyramids in Egypt and how. Mainstream Egyptology and archaeology have put forth uncompelling arguments and theories. Then, as further evidence of their own uncertainty about their ideas, they have tried to shut down and shut up researchers like Robert Bauval, Robert Schoch, and Graham Hancock.

The mainstream proposes that these pyramids were constructed by the ancient civilization we call the Egyptians. Their evidence is largely based on construction records for the much smaller and less complex pyramids that seem to be poor attempts to copy these larger structures.

They further hypothesize that stone age tools and manual labor were employed to construct the three large Pyramids at Giza. In the face of many modern engineers and construction companies stating this would be a Herculean task with modern techniques and cranes, this seems utterly implausible.

Why do they stick to these theories? There’s a very simple reason. They are controlled by a number of dogmatic scientific theories that limit the possibilities.

  1. We KNOW Faster-than-Light travel is not possible. So, aliens must be out of the question. This despite ample evidence from many ancient texts pointing to “gods” as humanity’s helper.
  2. Ancient advanced civilizations that may have had technology or technique equal to or beyond our 21st century capabilities because we KNOW human advanced civilization has been a one-time slow progression marked by biological evolution.
  3. Even if we accept the mainstream’s view of history, we KNOW that the ancients could not have had technology more advanced than we suspect.

This leaves them in a box. No help from the outside, no advanced technology, no possibility that these were built by a previous unknown advanced civilizations. Therefore, the Egyptians had to have done it in the accepted timeframe with the stone age tools and tons of human labor.

This is what happens to you when you refuse to accept a broader range of possibilities and lock in on “scientific dogmas.” We can all hope that a new generation of archaeologists will open their minds, broaden their perspective, and take all the evidence, in the dirt and beyond, into account.

Keep seeking, keep searching, my friends.

Ray